Theremin & Chesnokov

I discovered the theremin yesterday via Aftab Datta and Chesnokov today via Michael Polevoy.

The theremin, originally known as the aetherphone/etherophone, thereminophone or termenvox/thereminvox is an early electronic musical instrument controlled without discernible physical contact from the player. It is named after its Russian inventor, Professor Léon Theremin, who patented the device in 1928. The controlling section usually consists of two metal antennas which sense the position of the player’s hands and control oscillators for frequency with one hand, and amplitude (volume) with the other, so it can be played without being touched. The electric signals from the theremin are amplified and sent to a loudspeaker.

Pavel Grigorievich Chesnokov (Russian: Па́вел Григо́рьевич Чесноко́в) (24 October 1877 – 14 March 1944), also transliterated Tschesnokoff, Tchesnokov, Tchesnokoff, and Chesnokoff, was a Russian composer, choral conductor and teacher. He composed over five hundred choral works, over four hundred of which are sacred. Today, he is most known for his piece Salvation is Created as well as works such as Do Not Reject Me in Old Age (solo for basso profondo). His anthem O Lord God has served as the signature benedictory of The Nordic Choir of Luther College, Decorah, Iowa since 1948.

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2 thoughts on “Theremin & Chesnokov

  1. hb

    A busker plays this in the subway in toronto. I thought he was just messing around with a radio 😛

    Reply

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